Hands on with AADSync (RTM) – a Guide to Multi-Forest AD Synchronization and Attribute Filtering

INTRODUCTION

Office 365 is in many aspects best compatible with an on-premise infrastructure where the customer have followed Microsoft’s guidelines and best practices for design and configuration. A perfect example of such guideline is to keep all Active Directory user data associated with employees (personal user objects) within a single Active Directory forest. For many organizations, this is not the reality, often due to a background of growth by acquisitions where the acquired organisation remain their Active Directory data in their own forest that they always have been using. Such landscape is referred to as a “Multi-forest scenario” (one organization with users are spread across many Active Directory forests).

The aspect that makes the multi-forest scenario problematic is the user provisioning and administration. For single-forest customers (the number of domains within the forest does not matter), it have always been easy to deploy Directory Synchronization from your Windows Server AD forest to Azure AD by using DirSync – but that method have not been supporting the multi-forest scenario (DirSync supports single-forest synchronization only). Different alternatives have since the launch of Office 365 become available to address directory synchronization in the Multi-forest scenario (like the FIM AAD Connector), and there are still different ways to go at it – but now, better native support for this scenario is becoming a reality with the new Azure Active Directory Sync Services (AADSync). This article will provide an overview of the alternative methods, and a detailed step-by-step guide on how to configure multi-forest synchronization from two separate Active Directory forests to one single Azure AD/Office 365 tenant. We will also look in to the feature of Attribute Filtering within AADSync to demonstrate how selected AD attributes can be skipped in the synchronization (please note that filtering out attributes is now possible but not generally recommended, I will explain why later in the article).

MASTERING THE MULTI-FOREST SCENARIO – OPTIONS OVERVIEW (OR “READ THIS FIRST”)

If you are considering Office 365 (or other AAD integrated applications) and multiple Active Directory forests is your reality, consider the options below. Option D will later in the article be explained in detail. There is no preferred order or priority for the given options.

OPTION A – CONSOLIDATE THE FORESTS FIRST: If Active Directory consolidation (merging the forests in to one) is an option, that activity could be completed prior to adopting Azure AD/Office 365 to avoid the multi-forest scenario complexity. The objects that needs to be consolidated to one forest are the user objects for the employees and groups that relate to any of the Office 365 services (i.e distribution lists and mailbox security groups). Computer objects and service accounts etc can still remain in the trusted forest when activating AAD/Office 365 services.

OPTION B – MIX SYNCED IDs WITH CLOUD IDs: If the majority of users resides in one AD forest, and a limited number of users are in a separate forests, a good option can be to implement AD integration (AADSync, ADFS) to the primary forest, but create Cloud ID (separate identities in Azure AD) for the users that are in the separate forests. This creates a mix of integrated and separate identities in the same tenant. If you are using ADFS in the primary forest, keep in mind that users in the other forests (that get’s the Cloud IDs) can not have the same domain in their username, because federation is activated per domain (if domain1.com is activated for federation, domain1.com users can not use Cloud IDs with user@domain1.com usernames, they would have to use another domain for their usernames).

OPTION C – USE SHADOW ACCOUNTS: This option is similar to Option B, but with the ability to centrally manage all identities. Instead of creating Cloud IDs for the users residing in the separate forest(s), create corresponding user objects (“shadow accounts”) in the primary AD forest for those users instead, and let AADSync provision these accounts in AAD/Office 365. These “shadow accounts” allows the users in the separate forest(s) to login with a centrally managed account, but they will not have Single Sign-on with ADFS as they are not logging in to Windows with the same account as they are using for AAD/Office 365. This option allows ADFS Claim rules, centrally managed password policies and other benefits that comes with proper Active Directory integration – but have considerations regarding end-user experience for the shadow users (there is a separate password associated with the shadow account, etc).

OPTION D – SYNCHRONIZE ALL FORESTS WITH AADSYNC: The final option is to actually enable multi-forest synchronization. This can be accomplished either by using the AAD Connector in FIM that still is available, or by using the new Azure AD Sync Services (AADSync). It is recommended to use AADSync, as the FIM agent (as well as DirSync) is believed to be deprecated over time and replaced with AADSync completely. (A feature comparison between DirSync, FIM AAD Connector and AADSync can be found here). AADSync works like DirSync always have, but have native support for connecting with multiple Active Directory forests. How to implement and configure this option is explained in detail below.

IMPLEMENTING MULTI-FOREST SYNC WITH AADSYNC – SCENARIO OVERVIEW

I will now explain how to configure multi-forest synchronization step by step. Before jumping in to configuration, let’s have a look at the given scenario.

SOURCE: Two separate AD Forests containing users – FOREST-A.int and FOREST-B.int
TARGET: One Azure AD/Office 365 tenant.
METHOD: We will configure AADSync to synchronize objects from both forests to the tenant. We will also configure AADSync to filter out the ipPhone, homePhone and extensionAttribute9 AD attributes from the synchronization.

Overview. Users from FOREST-A and FOREST-B will be syncrhonized to Azure AD.

Overview of users in FOREST-A

Overview of users in FOREST-A

Overview of users in FOREST-B.

Overview of users in FOREST-B.

CONFIGURING MULTI-FOREST DIRECTORY SYNCHRONIZATION STEP-BY-STEP

Pre-requisites:

  1. You have an AAD/Office 365 tenant
  2. You have activated all your smtp-domains that are used in the organization (both forests) in your tenant.
  3. Your users have either or both their UPN-name and mail-attribute in Active Directory populated to match their primary smtp-address.
  4. You have one machine available to install AADSync (can be joined to any of the forests). The machine can access domain controllers in both forests and is able to resolve both forest DNS names.
  5. You have user account credentials to read both AD Forests, and you have a Global Administrator account to write to your Azure AD.

Make sure you meet all pre-requisites above. Then, let’s get started.

  1. The first step is to activate Active Directory Synchronization in your tenant. Do so by logging in to the admin portal, browse to users and follow the link at the top for setting up AD Synchronization.

    1activatedirsync

    Navigate to Users in your admin portal and follow the highlighted link to set up AD Synchronization. Notice in the screenshot that there are only two users (Cloud IDs) present in the tenant as of now.

  2. Click Activate to enable AD Synchronization in your tenant.
    2activatedirsync
  3. Download AADSync to the server where you want to install the tool. Get it here.
  4. Launch the installer executable (MicrosoftAzureADConnectionTool.exe).
    5launch_aads
  5. The installer let’s you choose the installation path and accept license terms. Click Install to continue.
    6wizard_Start
  6. The necessary components are now installed to the server (Sign-in Assistant, SQL LocalDB, SQL Native Client, the actual Sync Service etc). After the component installation, the wizard interface may disappear completely for about 30 seconds, but it will come back when it have finished loading the configuration wizard.
  7. The first step in the configuration wizard is to connect to your Azure AD. Enter the credentials for a Global Administrator in the tenant and hit Next to continue.
    7wizard1
  8. Next, enter credentials for the first forest you want to synchronize. Start by adding the forest to which you have joined the AADSync server (in this case this is FOREST-A). Hit Add Forest to verify the connectivity and credentials, and to add the next forest.
    8wizard2
  9. Add the next forest. Notice that I use the forest FQDN to specify the domain in the Username field (FOREST-B.int\jesper). I recommend this when adding the external forests to avoid an error that states “The specified domain does not exist or cannot be contacted.”, which may occur if only using the NetBIOS name (FOREST-B\jesper).
    9wizard3
  10. When both forests are added to the list, hit Next to continue.
    10wizard4
  11. The next option screen in the wizard covers settings for user matching. These options require careful consideration if you are using GAL Sync (or for any other reason have users represented as User and/or Contact objects in both forests) and/or are planning for a future Active Directory consolidation/migration of the forests that you currently are configuring for AADSync. Read the following rationales for these options before proceeding:


    Matching across forests: If your user objects only occurs in their respective forest, and are not replicated as a contact object or duplicate account in the other forest, leave the “Matching across forests” option at its default – “Your users are only represented once across all forests”. If objects are represented in many forests, you must make a selection for an attributed that can be used as a matching attribute to merge/join the duplicates to one Azure AD identity, or you will have collisions during the synchronization. More information is available if you follow the “Learn more about user matching” link in the wizard.

    Matching with Azure AD
    : These two options are used for identity federation. The sourceAnchor attribute is the immutable ID for the user, and must not be changed during the lifetime of a user object. The default choise – objectGUID – is a good choise IF YOU ARE NOT PLANNING AN ACTIVE DIRECTORY CONSOLIDATION OR MIGRATION IN THE FUTURE. The objectGUID attribute will change if the user is moved to another forest, and would in that case create a duplicate user in Azure AD (and a big mess to clean up). Use the objectGUID if you are certain that the affected user objects will remain in their current forest for their remaining lifetime. The userPrincipalName attribute is the attribute that will populate the Username in Azure AD (the corresponding UPN-name in AAD). Having users signing in to AAD/Office 365 with their primary smtp-address as their username is a best practice, so use the default – userPrincipalName – if attribute is matching the users smtp (email) addresses (or if you are planning them to do so). If your UPN names do not match the primary smtp-address and you are not planning on changing the UPNs to do so, consider using the mail-attribute instead (in that case, just remember to configure ADFS to use the same attribute by following these instructions).


    In summary: If your users are represented once across the forests (no GAL Sync or equal in place) and if your UPN-names are matching primary smtp-addresses, you can go ahead with the default options here, like I do in this example. Make your selection and hit Next to continue.
    11wizard5
  12. Next up are Optional features. At the time writing, Password Synchronization is not available in AADSync (RTM version, build 1.0.0419.0911). Password write-back is also in its final stages of development and will soon be available to customers that have an Azure AD Premium subscription (not included in Office 365). The Exchange Hybrid option must be selected if you are planning to set up an Exchange Hybrid Configuration between one of your on-premise Exchange organizations and Exchange Online (Multi-org Exchange hybrids are also in development but not yet available at the time writing). I am selecting Exchange hybrid deployment and Azure AD app and attribute filtering to demonstrate the new capabilities to filter out attributes from AADSync. Please note that I do not recommend that you use app and attribute filtering (see explanation below under “Should I filter out apps…”), I am making the selection in this example to demonstrate the capability. Make your selection and hit Next to continue.
    11wizard6
  13. If you selected the “Azure AD app and attribute filtering” in the previous step (not generally recommended), you will now have the option to filter out Azure AD apps (Office 365 services etc). Filtering out apps and attributes is possible, but before you decide doing so, please read the following rationale:
    Should I filter out apps and/or attributes from the synchronization? My general answer to this question is “No”. There are in my opinion three main reasons why you shouldn’t:REASON A – NO SECRETS IN ACTIVE DIRECTORY: By default, all users can read all attributes (not the passwords) for all objects in Active Directory. If you want to filter out attributes because you have secret data stored in AD attributes, you are doing things very wrong. Any user can open any AD or LDAP administration tool (like Active Directory Users and Computers) and read and/or export all your directory data from any machine in the network. If you are allowing shared AD accounts (like POS/kiosk accounts), you will not have any chance to log or trace such export either. You should not store any secret data in Active Directory attributes (another Microsoft Best Practice), and therefore synchronizing attributes to AAD that any user can read anyway should not be imposing a security threat to your organization.     
    REASON B - KEEP IT SIMPLE, IT IS YOUR PRIVATE DATA: If you filter out apps/attributes in your synchronization, you are immediately configuring a “special setup” with a complexity parameter added to it. Your tenant and your Azure AD is your private data. You are not sharing it with Microsoft or anyone else. Keep your AAD synchronization solution as simple as possible, trust Office 365, and synchronize all attributes as recommended to avoid incompatibility (surprises) in the future as AAD/Office 365 develops.     
    REASON C – FUNCTIONALITY AND RICH USER EXPERIENCE:
    To allow the very best end-user experience, GlobalAddress Lists, Lync Contact Cards, SharePoint profile sites etc should all be populated with as much information possible. If you decide to filter out attributes, you will take away functionality and “rich content” from your end users. It is also worth mentioning that Microsoft services, such as Exchange and Lync, depend on Active Directory attributes for their functionality – so filtering out an attribute that is not technically needed today might cause an upcoming feature not to work in your environment in the future. In this example, we are filtering out three attributes, but we will leave attribute scopes for all apps intact in this option screen. Make your selection and hit Next to continue.
    12wizard7
  14. As we selected to use “Azure AD app and attribute filtering” previously, we now get the chance to filter out specific attributes (the previous options screen for apps let us filter out sets of attributes based on specific apps/services). To demonstrate the attribute filtering capability, I am here filtering out the ipPhone, homePhone and extensionAttribute9 attributes from synchronization because we don’t want them to be visible in the Exchange Online Global Address List. I make the selection by first checking the “I want to further limit…” check box and then clearing the attributes from the list. Make your selection and hit Next to continue.
    13wizard8
  15. Next is a summary of your AADSync configuration. Check to see that everything looks OK and hit Configure to continue.
    14wizard9
  16. When the configuration is completed, you have the option to start the first Synchronization immediately, or to finish the wizard without starting the synchronization so that you can configure filtering before starting (if your would like to filter out specific OUs, child-domains or set an attribute based filtering). Filtering with AADSync works and is configured the same way as it always have with DirSync. Instructions on how to enable and configure filtering can be found here. In this example, we want to synchronize the complete scope of both forests, so we let the “Synchronize now” option stay selected and hit Finish to complete the wizard and start the synchronization.
    15wizard10
  17. Now, all we need to do is wait for the synchronization to complete. You can monitor the synchronization progress by opening the Synchronization Service Manager (the miisclient interface) from the Start menu. You can track the different stages of the synchronization in the Operations tab.
    16SyncServiceManager
  18. There is also another tool available with AADSync called the Synchronization Rules Editor (you will find it in the Start menu). This tool can be used to see and edit the attribute flows and scoping filters. You can use the tool to create transformation rules for certain attributes etc. In this example, we will not make any such changes, but we open it to have a look while we are waiting for the synchronization to complete.
    17SyncRuleEditor
  19. When the synchronization is completed, it is time to see the result. Sign in to the Office 365 admin portal and navigate to Users. Now, you will see users from both forests provisioned as synchronized identities “Status is Synchronized with Active Directory”. Success!
    18Syncedusers
  20. When opening a user from each forest, you see that both users are synchronized (get’s the banner stating they can only be edited in the local Active Directory) and that the user name matches the UPN-name in the local AD.
    19ForestAuser20ForestBuser
  21. The users can now be licensed and start using Office 365, or other AAD-integrated, services. You may also set up federated identities using ADFS and provide Single Sign-on to the users from both forests using a shared ADFS STS service with proper configuration.

SUMMARY AND DISCLAIMER

In this article we have seen how powerful and yet easy to use the new AADSync Service is. Multi-forest is a common and challenging reality for many enterprise customers, and with AADSync there is finally a robust, simple and supported way to get Active Directory synchronization working in that scenario. We are still waiting for the last details, like Password synchronization, a graphical interface for /fullsql installations (when synchronizing over 50 000 AD objects), support for multi-org Exchange hybrid configurations and password write-back capabilities (for AAD Premium customers) to work - but these features will all be available very soon. So thank you DirSync and FIM AAD Connector for the great years together, it have been great - but now it’s time for AADSync to take it from here.

ADFS 3.0 and Hardware Load Balancing – the Lost Documentation

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

ADFS and Federated Identities are common components for Enterprise Office 365 customers necessary to allow Single Sign-on, use of Claim Rules and immediate account lock-outs etc. As the availability the ADFS service decides the availability of Office 365 (if you can’t authenticate you can’t use the service), load balancing is a must-have. In most cases, Hardware Load Balancing (HLB) is used, and for ADFS 2.0 (Windows Server 2008/2008R2) and ADFS 2.1 (Windows Server 2012) this have never been a problem. You deployed your ADFS STS and/or ADFS Proxy, and published them with your Hardware Load Balancer like “any other SSL site” and it just worked.

Today, ADFS have with Windows Server 2012R2 reached version ADFS 3.0 – and the full “out-of-the-box-support” for using “any Hardware Load Balancer” is not as obvious any more. Making it  work is a bit more tricky, depending on what HLB you are using. The purpose of this article is to present my lessons learned from deploying ADFS 3.0 with HLB – and to save you from hours of trouble shooting when getting your own ADFS 3.0 HLB up and running with Office 365.

ADFS 3.0 AND HARDWARE LOAD BALANCING – WHAT COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG?

ADFS 3.0 and Web Application Proxy (WAP) in Windows Server 2012R2 uses an extension to the TLS SSL protocol called Server Name Indication – SNI (RFC 4366). This extension allows web servers to present host names when handshaking SSL, so that multiple SSL sites can be hosted on a shared IP-address and port (443) - just like the concept of host headers in good old http have always allowed us to do. This is great because it allows preservation of IP-addresses which also can reduce a total cost of ownership for a service (public IP-addresses does not come for free these days).

What is not so great is that the SNI extension is not yet supported by “everything else in the world” – such as very old web browsers – and Hardware Load Balancers. Using a HLB that does not have a clue about SNI will not work, and that is the topic of this blog post.

If you are interested to read more about SNI in Windows Server 2012R2 – and how to solve issues that can occur, I can recommend Ian Parramore’s excellent blog post on TechNet, which also have been a great inspiration and source of content to this post, found here.

HOW DO I KNOW THAT MY HLB DOES NOT SUPPORT SNI?

If your HLB does not support SNI, you will notice it eventually when attempting to configure a load balancing and you don’t get any response on port 443 from any of the server IP-addresses. (that’s usually when you spend a day or two troubleshooting firewall ACL’s and routing without any luck). My best advice is to look for SNI-related settings in the HLB administrative interface and read through the release notes for the software version you are running on the appliance(s).

Examples of observed behaviour when attempting to configure HLB with a non-SNI compliant device is a “Http/1.1 Service Unavailable” message from a Citrix NetScaler device and a “Network Error (tcp_error) A communication error occured: Connection refused” message from a BlueCoat device.

Big-IP/F5 customers may turn to a technical article written by Greg Coward for assistance in configuring the Big-IP to work with ADFS 3.0/WAP, found here.

MY HLB DOES NOT SUPPORT SNI – WHAT CAN I DO?

CHECK FOR UPDATES: Before attempting to fix the issue on the Windows Server side – you should always see if there is an available software/firmware update for your HLB device that includes SNI support. There is a workaround (see below), but having native support is usually preferred as it reduces the overall complexity of your solution.

WORKAROUND IT BY ADDING A FALLBACK BINDING (LET’S GET TECHY): It is possible to create a binding to make ADFS 3.0 and/or WAP to respond to SSL requests made out to ip-adresses. This is the recommended workaround as you can’t fully disable the SNI functionality completely. The process of adding this fallback binding consist of finding out the certificate thumbprint of your desired SSL certificate (added with private key to the Local Computer\Personal store) and then binding that thumbprint to all ip-adresses and for the ADFS or WAP application.

Follow these steps on all your ADFS 3.0 servers to add the fallback binding (and make your non-SNI compliant HLB be able to see your ADFS servers):

  1. Make sure that you have installed all available updates for Windows Server 2012R2 after adding and configured the ADFS STS or WAP Proxy role.
  2. Open a Command Prompt as administrator
  3. Run the following command:
    netsh http show sslcert
  4. You will see a list of SSL Certificate bindings.
  5. Mark and copy the ‘Certificate Hash’ value. Paste it to a temporary place (i.e Notepad)
  6. Mark and copy the ‘Application ID’ value. Paste it to the temporary place. The Application ID is what will associate the binding with ADFS 3.0 (for the internal STS servers) and WAP (for the ADFS Proxy).
  7. Now run the following commmand, where you insert the noted ‘Certificate Hash’ and ‘Application ID’ values from above (keep the { } characters):
    netsh http add sslcert ipport=0.0.0.0:443 certhash=Insert_Certificate_Hash_Here appid={Insert_Application_ID_here}
  8. Restart machine and repeat steps for remaining ADFS 3.0 machines.

After adding the fallback binding, your HLB should be able to reach your ADFS servers normally, and you can continue to configure and fine tune your load balancing. Be aware that if you replace your certificate in the future (when it expires), you must perform these steps again (a new certificate means a new certificate hash) – worth mentioning in your system documentation.

SUMMARY AND DISCLAIMER

Adding fallback bindings can help us fix our load balancing, but my hope is that SNI support in HLB devices will become more of a standard than it is today. Like stated in the article, looking for native support with a software/firmware update and proper documentation from your HLB vendor is always recommended before applying the fallback binding workaround. If you are aware of SNI-related knowledge base articles and software updates from HLB vendors, please share them with me in the comments field below or on Twitter (@JesperStahle) and I will add them to this article.

Internet Explorer 8 Only Loads Outlook Web App Light in Exchange Online/Office 365

BACKGROUND

Consider the following scenario:

You are using Exchange Online/Office 365. When opening Outlook Web App (OWA), Internet Explorer only loads the Light version of OWA (OWA Light). The same user on the same client could earlier load the rich OWA experience even on Internet Explorer 8.

If the same user logs on to Internet Explorer 9 or later, or the latest version of Firefox, Chrome or Safari, rich OWA is loaded instead. OWA Light is only enforced on Internet Explorer 8.

CAUSE

This behavior is by design. Rich OWA have earlier been allowed for Internet Explorer 8 users, but with limited performance (see this article). Starting May 2014, OWA Light is being enforced for Internet Explorer 8 users. This is stated in the Office 365 Service Description, see this article.

Quote from the Service Description:

“The user experience sending and receiving email with Outlook Web App and Internet Explorer 8 might be substantially diminished, especially when used on Windows XP or with low memory devices. Office 365 does not offer code fixes to resolve problems you encounter when using the service with Internet Explorer 8, and new Office 365 experiences might not work at all. You should also expect the quality of the user experience with Internet Explorer 8 to diminish further in the near future. Beginning in May 2014, Internet Explorer 8 will only display Outlook Web App Light.”

RESOLUTION

Upgrade Internet Explorer to the latest version, or use the latest version of an alternative browser. If you have legacy application dependencies to Internet Explorer 8, consider upgrading to Internet Explorer 11 and use IE Enterprise Mode to emulate IE8 rendering for those legacy web sites/applications.

And remember – Office 365 is an “evergreen” service, meaning that back-end updates will be released constantly. As a customer, you should keep your client applications on the latest version/build to stay fully compatible and supported. This includes Windows, Office applications and Internet Explorer.

Lync Client Asks for Credentials (“EWS not Deployed”) in an Exchange Hybrid Configuration

BACKGROUND

Consider the following scenario:

  1. You have successfully established an Exchange Hybrid Configuration between your on-premise Exchange Server installation and Exchange Online.
  2. You are using a fully functional Lync Server on-premise installation for all users.
  3. DNS zones for any of your primary SMTP domains exist in the internal network DNS (split-DNS is used)
  4. Some users are migrated to Exchange Online, and some are still residing in the Exchange Server installation on-premise.

The following symptoms occur:

  1. For users that are migrated to Exchange Online, sporadic credential prompts appear from the Lync client, asking users for username and password. Users that still have their mailbox residing in Exchange Server on-premise are not asked for credentials.
  2. The following message is displayed in Lync Configuration Information (right-click the Lync icon in the System Tray to find this option): EWS Information: EWS not Deployed

CAUSE

Two ways to update presence information: The Lync client is by default configured to update your presence based on your Exchange calendar (Personal information manager settings in the Lync client). Lync can read your presence information from Exchange by either receiving it through the Exchange Web Services (EWS) API, or by reading it from Outlook (if Outlook is installed and running). The EWS method is dependant on Exchange Autodiscover to be fully functional (details will follow under Resolution).

If, as in the scenario explained above, the Configuration Information indicates “EWS not deployed”, the Lync client will fail to use the EWS API to update presence information. Instead it will fall back to updating the presence information from Outlook.

But it worked before: The Outlook-method have so far worked fine, and will continue to work fine, for non-migrated users as the Lync client is running under the same user context as Outlook. When users are migrated to Exchange Online and configure Outlook to run in the Office 365 context (regardless if using ADFS/SSO or not), the Lync client will no longer be able to update the presence information from Outlook without first having you authenticate in the Lync client with the Office 365 credentials. Migrated users are no longer running Outlook and Lync in the same user context. This produces the credential prompt.

To resolve this, the EWS method should be used instead. The “EWS not deployed” error must be repaired.

RESOLUTION

Exchange Autodiscover is key: The Lync client will use Exchange Autodiscover to resolve the URL for EWS. Exchange Autodiscover is assumed to be working in this scenario as the Exchange Hybrid Configuration is established (which itself have a Heavy dependency to Autodiscover). If Exchange Autodiscover is a new topic for your, I suggest reading this article before continuing.

SCP vs. DNS: Outlook will use Active Directory Service Connection Points (SCP) to find the URL to Autodiscover on the internal network (Active Directory joined machines). Outside the internal network, Autodiscover URLs are distributed using public DNS (looking at the domain in your e-mail address and ask for Autodiscover records in that domain). As internal clients rely on SCP records in Active Directory, there have never been any need to add the DNS records for Autodiscover in the internal DNS zone (the split-zone) for the SMTP/SIP domains.

The Lync client will not use Active Directory SCP records to retrieve the Autodiscover URL. It will only use the DNS-record method. This differs from Outlook, which can use SCP records to find Autodiscover. Because of this difference, you might have a fully functional Outlook (finds Autodiscover via SCP-records) and a fully functional Exchange Hybrid Configuration (finds Autodiscover via A/SRV/CNAME records in the public DNS zone), but you will not have a functional Lync client (attempts to find Autodiscover from the internal split-zone for the SMTP/SIP domains).

How to fix it: In order for the Lync client to be able to find Autodiscover on the internal network, add A/SRV/CNAME records (whatever mirrors your public DNS records) in the internal DNS zone (the split-zone) to mirror the setup for Autodiscover records in the public DNS.

After adding internal DNS records for Autodiscover, the Lync client will be able to find Autodiscover and thus the URL for EWS. Through EWS, the Lync client can retrieve your presence information from the Exchange Online mailbox via the Exchange Hybrid Configuration, and users migrated to Exchange Online will no longer suffer from credential prompts appearing in the Lync client.

Office 365 and Web Proxy – the Lost Documentation

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Running Office 365 together with web proxy is supported and also the reality for many (or most) global Enterprise customers. Moving to Office 365 with web proxy present in your landscape is related to a number of considerations and possible configuration steps in order to ensure the best possible performance and functionality.

Guidelines for customers using web proxy do exist in the Office 365 Service Description and Deployment Guide. However, the information is scattered between different articles, why it can be unclear for the solution architect or network administrator to get a clear view on the considerations and principles that apply when using web proxy with Office 365. The purpose of this article is to collect the available information (plus some notes from the field) in one place to form an assembly on the given topic.

THE CLOUD AND WEB PROXY – WHAT COULD POSSIBLY GO WRONG?

Having a web proxy and running cloud based services might seem like the perfect fit. “The service is on the Internet, and our web proxy accelerates the Internet traffic to our end users web browsers – what could possibly go wrong?”.

There is no general answer to what could go wrong - it depends on what Office 365 services you plan to enable, and also what type of web proxy you are using.

But, to give an idea, here are five examples of things that might break when deploying Office 365 behind web proxy without first taking the right precautions:

  1.  Office Pro Plus Click-2-Run installation fails with the reason: “Something went wrong – Sorry, we ran into a problem.” (Explained here).
  2. Outlook might lose it’s Connection to the Exchange server intermittently. A “balloon message” in the lower right explains “The connection to Microsoft Exchange is unavailable. Outlook must be online or connected to complete this action.”
  3. Downloading files from SharePoint Online takes an unreasonable amount of time to complete.
  4. Send and receive in Outlook works, except for downloading the Offline Address Book (gives error 0X8004010F).
  5. Outlook might take several minutes to start/load. (Explained here).

To remediate all the example errors above, and many others like them, read through and act upon the following considerations:

CONSIDERATION #1 – IF POSSIBLE, BYPASS THE WEB PROXY COMPLETELY FOR OFFICE 365

If your network configuration and security policies allows you to bypass your web proxy for selected services/sites on the Internet, it is strongly recommended that you consider adding Office 365 to such exception list and open your client networks for direct access to Office 365s URLs (strongly recommended) or IP address ranges. Generally, Office 365 will always work best without the client being behind a web proxy. If making such exceptions is not an option in your case, keep reading the following considerations and recommendations.

RECOMMENDATION: If excluding services/sites from the web proxy is an option, and you can allow web traffic directly from the client networks to selected hosts on the Internet, use this article to find the specifications for what URLs (using IP-ranges are not recommended) are used by Office 365 and allow the traffic directly. The list is subject to update, monitor the Change Notification RSS feed to keep your access lists current. Also remember to add all URLs to the proxy bypass list on the client (in your PAC file or in the Internet Explorer settings) to avoid Office 365 traffic to go through the web proxy spitefully).

For the majority of the services (like using the portal, SharePoint Online, OneDrive for Busienss, Exchange Online and the Outlook client), you will only need to open port 80/443, but additional ports are needed for Lync. Specifications on ports and protocols are found here.

CONSIDERATION #2 – NAT:ED IP ADDRESSES AND NUMBER OF CONCURRENT SESSIONS

This topic applies even without web-proxy, but definitely relates to your web proxy configuration.

In the Office 365 Service Description, there is a topic called “Plan for Internet bandwidth usage for Office 365″, found here.

In that topic, Microsoft explains the limitations that applies when using Network Address Translation (NAT) in respect to the amount of ports that are available to share between users behind the NAT:ed IP-address (public/Internet facing address). I recommend reading the article for details (sub-topic “NAT support with Office 365″), but here is the summary:

Clients for Office 365 in general, and Outlook in particular, opens sessions with the service in the cloud. These sessions consumes the shared amount of ports that are available per Internet facing NATed IP-address. The general guidance is to add a public facing IP address per 2000 concurrent users to share. Personally I recommend adding one NAT address per 5000 concurrent users.

RECOMMENDATION: Read the article above and scale out the amount of public IP-addresses to provide for your number of concurrent users. For example, if you are using one proxy server with one single NATed address to the Internet to provide for 10 000 concurrent users, add one or two more IP-addresses to you web proxy configuration (configure a NAT pool, add NIC or add additional IP addresses, whichever works for your web proxy). Add more IP-addresses for more concurrent users.

CONSIDERATION #3 - RFC1323 (TCP WINDOW SCALING)

An excellent article on this topic can be found here: http://blogs.technet.com/b/onthewire/archive/2014/03/28/ensuring-your-office-365-network-connection-isn-t-throttled-by-your-proxy.aspx

The article explains how disabling the TCP Window Scaling mechanism in any network device may cause very bad performance to Office 365 (and probably other services as well). In the example used in the article, the download time for a 14 MB PDF file is reduced from over 8 minutes to just 32 seconds by simply enabling the Auto Scaling mechanism in the web proxy. That is pretty remarkable.

RECOMMENDATION: Make sure that RFC1323/TCP Windows Scaling is enabled in all network segments from your clients to the Internet. See the TechNet-article for details. If you are running Bluecoat, you can follow this article to find out if you have RFC1323 enabled or not: https://kb.bluecoat.com/index?page=content&id=FAQ1006

CONSIDERATION #4 – NECESSARY EXCEPTIONS (BEWARE OF CACHING, TRAFFIC INSPECTION AND AUTHENTICATION PROMPTS)

On of the key benefits with having a web proxy is its ability to cache content from the web to increase performance and decrease use of Internet bandwidth. However, the Office 365 services is not always fully compatible with content caching, and it is not recommended to use such technology. Read this post for official statement and details: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2690045/

The article is addressing WAN Optimizers, but the principal applies to web proxy as well. The bottom line is that caching the data might interrupt the service protocols and thus deteriorate performance rather than improving it.

Content caching will not improve any performance in Outlook as the user is working against a local copy of the mailbox (the OST-file created when Outlook is running in Cached mode). There is often a debate if content caching can improve SharePoint Online performance when working with large files – but my recommendation is to try without content caching and later enable it just for SharePoint Online to compare. If there is no, or a minimal, performance increase – you best stay without content caching to comply with the principles stated in the article above. For Lync Online, content caching can not help increasing performance either.

Further, web proxies have the ability to inspect web traffic for malicious content and filter out suspicious traffic before it can be downloaded to any client. These technologies go under many names (Content Inspection, DPI, DCI etc), but the principal is the same – traffic is inspected in transport and rules may filter it if found suspicious. Such content inspection might also disturb Office 365 client protocols, and cause intermittent disconnection and/or performance decrease.

Another element of the web proxy is its ability to secure web traffic by only allowing authenticated users to access the Internet. This will require authentication of some sort for the user. If single Sign-on (SSO) authentication is enabled for the web proxy, this should not be a problem with Office 365, but if the web proxy presents credential prompts (operating system based or as forms in the actual browser) as part of the day-to-day user experience, you can expect those prompts to be a an issue for Office 365 to function as well.

RECOMMENDATION: Three parts are covered in this consideration and recommendation – content caching, traffic inspection and authentication without seamless SSO. None of these components are fully compatible with Office 365, why you should make sure to exclude Office 365 URLs in the web proxy for all of them. The web proxy will function just as a proxy/relay for the Internet traffic, but not cache its content, inspect it’s traffic or require authentication if the user have not already authenticated. The URLs to exclude can be found in this article: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh373144.aspx under the topic “URLs/FQDNs for Office 365″. After adding the exception list in your web proxy, make sure to visit the Change log for URLs now and then to check for updates. There is also an RSS feed of the updates that you can subscribe to.

CONSIDERATION #5 – PAC SCRIPTS AND IE SETTINGS

There are different methods of distributing the web proxy settings to the clients in the network. One is to Proxy Auto-Config (PAC) files that you either distribute to your browser automatically with the WPAD protocol (DHCP and DNS lookups) or you can specify the URL to the PAC manually or by using Group Policies. If not using PAC at all, you can specify the hostname directly to the web proxy, also manually or via Group Policy.

All methods works with Office 365, but problems may occur if you are not using PAC files, but your Internet Explorer settings suggest that you do (“Automatically detect settings” or “Use automatic configuration script” is enabled).

The first symptom of this is usually that Outlook takes several minutes to load (explained here). Another symptom might be that 3rd party applications that attempt to access Office 365 services (such as a mailbox in Exchange Online), simply can’t connect to the service. The Internet Explorer settings are very sensitive, and they might require some adjustments before everything operates as expected. Often, the setting “Bypass proxy server for local addresses” plays an important role in the trouble shooting.

RECOMMENDATION: Generally, the most solid setup for Office 365 together with web proxy is when using PAC files with the correct settings in Internet Explorer. If you are not using PAC files, make sure that your IE settings do not suggest that such file exist on the network, and keep your eyes and ears open for bad Outlook performance and similar indications.

SUMMARY AND DISCLAIMER

As stated initially, the first recommendation is to exclude Office 365 from the web proxy completely and allow clients to reach the specific IP ranges/URLs directly from the client. If such exception is not an option, the other considerations and recommendations in this article will hopefully help you to achieve the best possible performance and experience with Office 365.

Please note that this article is written based on field experience, and that the scenarios explained might or might not apply to your scenario and your specific web proxy. Any feedback to this article is very welcome to my Twitter, @JesperStahle. My intention is to keep this article up to date with guidelines for using web proxy with Office 365 – so if you know more considerations and recommendations that you should make the list, please let me know.

Hands on with the new Office 365 Message Encryption (OME)

INTRODUCTION

New capabilities are available in Office 365 for sending encrypted e-mails to external recipients. Microsoft announced this late 2013 as an upcoming feature in this blog post: http://blogs.office.com/2013/11/21/introducing-office-365-message-encryption-send-encrypted-emails-to-anyone/

In this post, I will demonstrate the user experience of Office 365 Message Encryption, both for the end-user and the administrator.

SCENARIO

We will create a transport rule that will enable Office 365 Message Encryption on messages with a Sensitivity level set to Confidential.

STEP 1 – ENABLE IRM LICENSING

If you attempt to use Office 365 Message Encryption before first enabling IRM licensing, the operation will fail and give you this message:

You can’t create a rule containing the ApplyOME or RemoveOME action because IRM licensing is disabled.

To remediate this, we need to enable IRM licensing using the Admin portal and PowerShell. Follow these steps:

  1. First, enable RMS in your tenant by logging on to your Office 365 Admin Portal, navigate to Service settings (left pane). select Rights management (top bar), click Manage and finally hit the button Activate. A message should appear stating that RMS is activated for the tenant.
  2. The remaining steps will be done in PowerShell. Open Windows Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell, found here:
    http://technet.microsoft.com/library/jj151815.aspx
  3. Connect your PowerShell session to your Office 365 tenant an Exchange Online by entering the following:
    $msolcred = Get-Credential (Answer the credential prompt with your Office 365 tenant administrator credentials) 
    Connect-MsolService -Credential $msolcred

    $Session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://outlook.office365.com/powershell-liveid/ -Credential $msolcred -Authentication Basic -AllowRedirection
    Import-PSSession $Session
  4. When connected to Exchange Online, you can enable IRM licensing with just a few steps. The frirst step is to set the RMS Online key sharing location. You will use different configurations depending on where your tenant is located (North America, European Union or the Asia-Pacific area).Enter the command that matches your tenant location (choose one):
    North America: Set-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnlineKeySharingLocation https://sp-rms.na.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc
    European Union: Set-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnlineKeySharingLocation https://sp-rms.eu.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc
    The Asia-Pacific Area: Set-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnlineKeySharingLocation https://sp-rms.ap.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc
  5. After setting the key sharing location, the next step is to import the Trusted Publishing Domain (TPD). Do so by entering the following:
    Import-RMSTrustedPublishingDomain -RMSOnline -name “RMS Online”
  6. The final step is to activate the internal IRM licensing. Do so by entering the following:
    Set-IRMConfiguration -InternalLicensingEnabled $True
  7. After enabling IRM licensing, verify the functionality by entering:
    Test-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnline

The test should pass with the result OVERALL RESULT: PASS.

NOTE: Enabling IRM licensing might need several hours for the change to take effect. If possible, allow 8 hours to pass before proceeding with STEP 2.

STEP 2 – CREATE THE OME TRANSPORT RULE

We will create a transport rule that enables Office 365 Message Encryption if the message is sent to a recipient outside the organization and the Sensitivity header have been set to Confidential.

Follow these steps:

  1. Log in to your Office 365 Admin Portal and navigate to Exchange Control Panel (Admin\Exchange).
  2. Navigate to Mail Flow, click the + icon and select Create a new rule…
    Newrule
  3. Give the rule a suiting name and click More options…
    moreoptions
  4. From here you can set your condition as it fits your needs, but for this example we will inspect the Sensitivity header and apply Message Encryption based on that. To do so, select the following conditions:
    Apply this rule if… A message header includes any of these words
    amessageheader
  5. Complete the Apply this rule if-condition by clicking the properties Enter text and Enter word so that the condition makes ‘Sensitivity’ header includes ‘Confidential’
    sensincl
  6. Click Add condition and select The recipient… Is external/internal. Click Select one… and select Outside the organization and hit OK
    outside
  7. Proceed with clicking Do the following… and select Modify the message security… and select Apply Office 365 Message Encryption
    applyo365m
  8. Hit Save at the bottom of the New rule editor. (If you get the message that IRM licensing is not enabled and have completed STEP 1 – please allow more time for the change to take effect, as stated in the Note after STEP 1).

STEP 3 – SEND A CONFIDENTIAL MESSAGE WITH OME

We will create a message with the sensitivity level set to Confidential and send this to a recipient outside our organization. Our transport rule will apply Office 365 Message Encryption to the message.

Follow these steps:

  1. Open Outlook or Outlook Web App. Both clients have the native functionality to set the sensitivity header. In the example, I will use OWA, but the procedure is the same in Outlook.
  2. Compose a new message. Enter an external recipients, give the message a subject and some content, then click  and Show message options…
    messageopt
  3. Set the message Sensitivity level to Confidential and hit OK
    confidential
    NOTE: In the rich Outlook client, Sensitivity options are found under Message Options\More options\Sensitivity.
  4. Send the message.

STEP 4 – RECEIVE AND OPEN THE ENCRYPTED MESSAGE

  1. Open the inbox of the external mailbox and find the encrypted message
    protectedmessage
  2. As you can see, the message includes an attached HTML-document. Open the attachment.
  3. Click VIEW YOUR ENCRYPTED MESSAGE to continue
    viewem
  4. To be able to read the encrypted message, you are required to sign in with a Microsoft Account or Corporate Credentials (WAAD/Office 365 account) that has a username that matches the e-mail adress to which the encrypted message was sent. This is the same principle as External Sharing in SharePoint Online/OneDrive for Business. In the example, we will login with a Microsoft Account.
    signin
  5. Enter your Microsoft Account credentials.
    signin2
  6. The message will now load and be displayed in the browser.
    voila

CONCLUSION

The Office 365 Message Encryption looks very promising. This post demonstrated its basic capabilities, but you can make even more advanced Mail Rules, such as applying RMS templates to the message if it is sent to an internal recipient, and use Office 365 Message Encryption only to external recipients – just configure the rule to fit your needs.

You can also customize the message that includes the HTML-file by using the
Set-OMEConfiguration cmdlets. The cmdlets allow you to set custom e-mail text, disclaimer, portal text and even include your company logo for branding.

 

Can’t login to Lync Online on Domain Joined Machine in a Single Labeled Domain (SLD)

BACKGROUND

  1. You are using Lync Online together with Lync or Lync Basic client.
  2. You’r  client is joined to an Active Directory domain with Single Label Name (SLD). FQDN Name is, as an example, “domain” and not “domain.local”
  3. You can logon to Lync using mobile clients or from other clients than are not domain joined to your Single Labeled Domain.
  4. When logging on with the Single Labeled Domain joined machine, the Lync Client gives the following error:
    The Server is temporarily unavailable. If the problem continues, please contact your support team.

CAUSE

Single Labeled Domains are not supported with Lync Server, but there is no documentation regarding Lync Online instead of an on-premise Lync installation in combination with a client running from a Single Labeled Domain.

The fact is that this combination does not work wihtout additional configuration (see Resolution). Allthough the Lync Online infrastructure is not running in a Single Labeled Domain, the client can’t login from a machine joined to a Single Labeled Domain.

RESOLUTION

To solve this, all users that are running Lync Online must have a proper UPN-suffix in Active Directory. There is NO NEED to login with the UPN-name, but the attribute itself must be populated.

Follow these steps to verify the solution with a few users, before applying to all users:

  1. In you Active Directory forest, add an additional UPN Suffix. As suggestions to what to add, you can add the same as your SMTP domain(s), or just use the current SLD and add “.com”. Instructions on how to add UPN Suffix can be found here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/243629
  2. On your own (an/or other) user account(s), change the UPN Suffix to the newly added “domain.com-like” using Active Directory Users and Computers. You find the UPN suffix on the Account tab, the right drop-down box under “User logon name”
  3. Wait for AD Replication to complete (15 minutes give or take, depending on number of AD sites etc.)
  4. Log off and on to your workstation
  5. Attempt to log in to Lync again
  6. Repeat for remaining users

With a correct UPN Suffix, Lync Online will allow you to log on from the domain joined machine, regardless if you logged in with your samAccountName or the full UPN-name.

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Shared Accounts (POS/Kiosk) and Single Sign-On in the Same Environment

BACKGROUND

You have successfully configured Single Sign-on in Office 365 with the following conditions:

  1. ADFS is deployed with one internal pair (STS) and one external pair (Proxy), both pairs are load balanced. ADFS is running at least version 2.0 with the latest Update Rollup installed.
  2. Clients that resides on the internal network have the ADFS URL (in this example sts.Company.com) pointing to the ADFS STS server pair (the LB VIP).
  3. Clients that resides on the external network have the ADFS URL (sts.Company.com) pointing to the ADFS Proxy pair (the LB VIP).
  4. On all Active Directory-domain joined clients, the ADFS URL (sts.Company.com) is added to the Local Intranet Zone using a Site-to-Zone Assignment List GPO.
  5. You have not configured ADFS to allow Single Sign-on for non-IE browsers (Disable Extended Protection).
  6. You have verified that Single Sign-on works as expected by navigating to http://outlook.com/OWA/company.com (where Company.com is a custom domain that is configured as a Federated Domain in your Office 365 tenant). When navigating to the URL, you are redirected to Outlook Web App without being prompted for credentials.

This scenario is exactly what we want for our users that are logging on to Windows everyday using their personal Active Directory account. It is a seamless solution that allow the user to consume Office 365 services without entering credentials multiple times through-out the working day.

The problem is if parts of the organization is using common/shared Active Directory accounts for logging on to Windows. A few examples of when common Active Directory accounts are used for logging on to Windows are at: Point of Sale terminals (POS), front desk/receptions, and at heavy industry operation sites (factory users are restricted by gloves/outfit).

These users will not be able to access their personal Office 365 services as they are logged in to Windows with the shared account, and when attempting to access, for example, Outlook Web App, they either get a message that the current account does not have a valid license (if the shared account is not licensed), or they will be logged in to the wrong mailbox (if a licensed user is logged on to Windows when the other user is taking over the session). The user have no chance to login as themselves to reach their personal mailbox etc, as we have configured Single Sign-on to Office 365, without any credential prompts allowed.

In summary, we have a situation where users logging on with personal Active Director accounts to their personal computers have a perfect experience with Single Sign-on, but our users without personal computes that are logging on to Windows with shared accounts, are simply not able to reach their mailbox and other data without first logging in to Windows with their personal account – which is not feasible for the business operation.

CAUSE

This bevaviour is fully expected. It is not ideal for users to share Active Directory accounts for loggin on to Windows, both from the security perspective (complicance and auditing) and from the functional perspective (single sign-on and personal data access). To remediate it, the general recommendation is of course to have all users logging on to Windows with personal Active Directory accounts, but in reality, this is not always possible. The reasons are many, and they are not described on TechNet or in any text book examples, but they are usually related to the time it actually takes to log off and log back on. At a POS, every lost second can be a lost sale, and at the factory floor, every lost second can be a compromise of a persons safety.

Technically, our Single Sign-on configuration is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. A user attempts to reach Outlook Web App, get’s redirected to ADFS STS and authenticates using the Kerberos TGT-ticket issued for the shared account when logging on to Windows. ADFS grants a Token, including claims for the shared account. The Token is then presented to Office 365, who translates the claims to either a non-licensed user (giving the No license error), or if it exist, to the mailbox for the shared account (loading the wrong mailbox for the user).

RESOLUTION

To remediate this problem, without affecting the Single Sign-on experience for our Office workers with personal computers, we must break the Single Sign-on configuration only for the shared accounts.

To accomplish this, we will configure the Site to Zone Assignment List GPO.

As stated in the Background above, the ADFS URL sts.Company.com is added to the Local Intranet Zone to allow Single Sign-on. If we remove it from there, the user will not be able to present the Kerberos TGT-ticket when logging on, and we will prompted for credentials again. This is a bad user experience and should never be the routine for Office users with personal computer and personal accounts, but such credential prompt is what can allow a user that has logged on with a shared user account to actually login to Outlook Web App (or other Office 365 Service) with a personal account and reach the personal mailbox.

High-level description of the solution:

  1. Depending on how Group Policy is used in your organization today, first decide if this setting should be computer based or user based. Both can be applied for this.
  2. Configure separate Site to Zone Assignment List GPO’s for personal Active Directory accounts and for common/shared Active Directory accounts. (Or for personal computers or shared computers, depending of outcome in #1).
  3. For the personal account/computer GPO, place sts.Company.com in the Local Intranet Zone – this will give them Single Sign-on
  4. For the shared accounts/computers, Place sts.Company.com in the Trusted Sites zone – this will break Single Sign-on and give the user a credential prompt on access to the services. The user can respond to the credential prompt with personal credentials and by that accessing the personal mailbox/data.

Here is a good overview of the Site to Zone Assignment List GPO: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/askie/archive/2012/06/05/how-to-configure-internet-explorer-security-zone-sites-using-group-polices.aspx (Scroll down a bit).

COMMENT: Some organizations solves this issue by letting all clients redirect sts.company.com to the ADFS Proxy even internally. This methdo will also present the credential prompt, but it will affect all users – including those that are using personal accounts on personal computers – which is a bad user experience for them. Using GPO and Site to Zone assignment is  a better way to go.

PST Capture Tool 2.0 Only Imports Deleted Items Folder

BACKGROUND

You are attempting to import data to Exchange Online mailboxes using the PST Capture Tool 2.0 (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36789). The following works:

1. You can import PST files to the tool
2. You can map the PST files to mailboxes in Exchange Online (x64 bit version of Outlook is required to see the mailboxes)
3. If you open the PST file in Outlook on the machine, you can see all the content

When starting the Import, the stage called “Transferring” completes 100%. Then, when the Import stage begins, you can see that it only finds 2 folders. The progress shows Importing Folder 0/2, 1/2 and then 2/2.

After the import is done, you can see in the Exchange Online mailbox that the only content that have been imported is the Deleted Items folder.

CAUSE

This occurs if the PST file that is imported is in an incompatible format. Without going into, or knowing, the details of it all, PST files can be created in different structures. The version of Outlook together with how PST Capture Tool 2.0 works decide if all content in the PST files root folder (IPM_SUBTREE) will be visible to the operation or not. Read more here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff387699(v=office.12).aspx

The error can occur when the PST file have been exported from Exchange Server 2010 SP3 using New-MailboxExportRequest.

RESOLUTION

Run SCANPST.EXE from the Program Files\Microsoft Office\(VersionNumber) folder on the machine. Use SCANPST.EXE to scan and repair the PST files you want to import. After repairing the file, PST Capture 2.0 will import all folders and objects.

This process takes a while, and if you are to do 100+ mailboxes, it might have a severe impact to your planning. Depending on the PST file, it might help to change Outlook version on the machine where you run PST Capture 2.0 – just make sure that it is always x64 bit.

Autodiscover and rich Outlook configuration fails but SSO for OWA/Lync/Portal works (“The AD FS 2.0 Windows Service service failed to start due to the following error: The service did not respond to the start or control request in a timely fashion.” ExRCA: “A network error occurred while communicating with the remote host. “) – CRL check in ADFS is failing

BACKGROUND

The following works:

  • You have successfully deployed ADFS and Single Sign-on  with Office 365
  • You can successfully log on to the Office 365 Portal, Outlook Web App and the rich Lync client using SSO (Active Directory credentials) both from the inside and outside (through ADFS Proxy)
  • You have added the correct CNAME for the Autodiscover service in the public and internal DNS zone for you custom domain
  • You can successfully access the ADFS metadata from the outside by opening https://sts.domain.com/adfs/services/trust/mex in the web browser – it displays content. (sts.domain.com is the URL to your ADFS Proxy)

The following does not work:

  • When attempting to configure an ActiveSync device with Autodiscover (entering e-mail address and AD-password), the configuration fails and the device asks for server name.
  • When attempting to configure your rich Outlook client, the configuration fails and repeatedly ask for username and password during Autodiscover configuration
  • ExRCA (http://testexchangeconnectivity.com) tests for Autodiscover fails with the following error:
    Testing TCP port 443 on host autodiscover.domain.com to ensure it’s listening and open.
      The specified port is either blocked, not listening, or not producing the expected response
    Additional Details
      A network error occurred while communicating with the remote host.

CAUSE

As SSO with the Office 365 portal, Outlook Web App and the rich Lync Client works, as well as accessing the ADFS Metadata, you will probably not think that this issue is ADFS related, but rather related to a back-end error of sort in the Exchange Online service. However, looking in to the ADFS configuration, you may find event 7000 with the following explanation:

The AD FS 2.0 Windows Service service failed to start due to the following error: The service did not respond to the start or control request in a timely fashion.

This is related to why Autodiscover, ActiveSync and the rich Outlook client configuration will not work.

If you investigate the network traffic while attempting to start the ADFS Service, you might find that the service is attempting to do a CRL check for the certificates. This fails, which causes the service start to time out – leaving you with an ADFS service that works good for Office 365 portal, OWA and Lync – but not Autodiscover, ActiveSync and rich Outlook.

This may occur if:

  1. The ADFS servers can’t access the Internet for CRL lookups
  2. You are attempting to use web Proxy for the CRL lookups, but the Proxy configuration is faulty (bad IE Connections settings or missing connectivity between ADFS servers and the web Proxy itself)

The failing CRL check will not reveal itself in the event log, you can however see it by monitoring the network traffic.

RESOLUTION

First, verify that the ADFS Service account have Log on as a Service and Log on as a batch job rights. (The behavior can occur if this is missing as well). Then, follow one of the solutions below to remediate the problem with CRL verification access from the ADFS servers.

Solution 1 – Fix the CRL Access:

  1. Verify that you have proper web Proxy (IE Connections) settings on the ADFS servers. Verify that you can access the Internet, or needed Internet hosts for CRL checks in your Environment.
  2. Start the service and see that it comes online properly.

Solution 2 – Turn off Automatic Root Certificates Update:

  1. Open gpedit.msc (Start\Run)
  2. Navigate to Computer Configuration \ Administrative Templates \ System \ Internet Communication \ Internet Communication
  3. Open Turn off Automatic Root Certificates Update and set it to Enabled
  4. Start the service and see that it comes online properly.

Note: Solution 2 is here described for the local Group Policy which applies if you are using Security Baseline configuration on the server. If an Active Directory GPO is controlling this setting, you need to set this in the AD GPO.

 

After applying Solution 1 or 2 above, and verifying the Log on as a service and Log on as a batch job rights for the ADFS Service Account, Autodiscover and rich Outlook configuration will work.